Memorial Unveiling Honours African & Caribbean Military Personnel

Thousands are expected to gather in Windrush Square in Brixton, South London, on Thursday, June 22 for the unveiling of a memorial to commemorate the two million African and Caribbean military servicemen and women who served in World War I and World War II.

The unveiling, which is spearheaded by the Nubian Jak Community Trust is hailed to be Europe’s premier black cultural event this year.  It is expected to be attended by war veterans, in-service men and women, dignitaries including the Mayor of London and Chief Exec of Lambeth Sean Harris, Baroness Ros Howells (patron of the African and Caribbean Memorial), Chiefs of Defence Staff from Caribbean and African countries, High Commissioners from Commonwealth Nations, ambassadors, members of the House Lords, Members of Parliament, as well as the general public.

The unveiling ceremony will include a spectacular military salute, a dazzling display of the flags, commemorative tributes by dignitaries, and a spectacular parade that includes Tambu Bambou masqueraders, and carnival puppets and stilt walkers.

The memorial, which is designed in the shape of two 6ft obelisks, made of Scottish Whin stone, housed on 10.5ft Pyramidal plinth made of Ancaster stone, with a combined weight of just under 5 tonnes, is being unveiled to ensure the contribution of African and Caribbean countries and people to WWI and WWII is known and identified respectfully and globally.

Quote:

Jak Beula CEO of the Nubian Jak Community Trust, said: “More than 2 million African and Caribbean Military Servicemen and Servicewomen’s participated in WWI and WWII but have not been recognized for their contribution. The unveiling of this memorial is to correct this historical omission and to ensure young people of African and Caribbean descent are aware of the valuable input their forefathers had in the two world wars.”

Additional Information;

This long-awaited project will be accompanied by a public awareness single titled ‘I Have a Song’, a play and book, both titled ‘Remembered’, and a world celebration concert – ‘Remembered’ – featuring many of the UK’s leading African and Caribbean artists.

  • I Have A Song – by Memorial Aid was recorded by Nubian Jak (from the UK) and multi award Grammy nominated artist Eric Roberson (from the US).  The single is available on iTunes, Spotify, Amazon and other platforms.
  • REMEMBERED: In Memoriam: Is the explosive souvenir journal published to accompany the historic unveiling.  The book is the most up to date compilation of the African and Caribbean experiences in both World Wars and includes a foreword from Her Majesty the Queen.  Book Launch June 20th 6:30pm Brixton Library, Brixton Hill SW2 1JQ
  • REMEMBERED: The Theatre Play: is a story of bravery and betrayal, two families, two world wars, and a reality game show!  The play was written by playwright Richard Reid and is the flagship production by BAP Theatre as part of their 25th The world premier of the play will take place 7:30pm at the Paul Robeson Theatre on 21st June (day before memorial unveiling).  For more information contact the Paul Robeson Theatre Box Office on 0203 743 2329 or purchase tickets from www.acmemorial.com
  • REMEMBERED: World Celebration Concert will take place 7:30pm at POW Live in Brixton on the evening of 22nd Hosted by DJ Elaine Smith, the artists performing include Jazzie B, Janet Kay, Omar, DJ Elaine , Keith Waithe, Nairobi Thompson, and special guest from Africa – Kanda Bongo Man.  POW Live 467- 469 Brixton Rd, Brixton, London SW9 8HH. Tel: 0207 095 1978. Or visit www.acmemorial.com
  • REMEMBERED: The Treasure Trail a schools workshops exhibition on a tour of London libraries, with a treasure trail competition, for under 16’s.  At Camberwell Library, 48 Camberwell Green, to 3rd June; Brixton Library from 5th – 24th June.

For more information, please contact the African and Caribbean Memorial Trust team

Tel: 0207 692 4880 Website: www.acmemorial.com Email: info@acmemorial.com

Follow us on Twitter  @acmemorial


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